Housekeeping (at home and work)

This post is a way of exploring some contradictory thinking about housekeeping. In my last post on strategies for working during tough times, the small, shallow, short-term tasks I identified can be understood as a type of academic housekeeping. At work, as at home, women tend to do more of it, and it holds less … Continue reading Housekeeping (at home and work)

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Ideal academics (and the women behind them)

A highlight of the week on Twitter has been the hashtag from @bruceholsinger #thanksfortyping which reveals the contributions of anonymous wives to the research of male academics: A peek at an archive of women's academic labor: wives thanked for typing their husbands' manuscripts. 1/5 #ThanksForTyping @TheMedievalDrK pic.twitter.com/yAf03lsweg — Bruce Holsinger (@bruceholsinger) March 25, 2017 This … Continue reading Ideal academics (and the women behind them)

Academic/ woman/ carer

I love International Women's Day. (Being a slow academic, I can get away with this post being two days late, right?) It combines exciting bookish announcements - especially the Stella Prize shortlist for Australian women's writing, which I read every year - and great conversations with daughters: Explaining #IWD to my 5y.old daughter. "That's such a good … Continue reading Academic/ woman/ carer

Research targets: the pirate code for academics

Today I had a short conversation with an early career academic that made me thankful that I decided to start this blog. I enjoyed talking with her - it was our first meeting, and she came across as smart, ambitious and engaging. She is also working at a punishing rate. She told me that six … Continue reading Research targets: the pirate code for academics

Redefining early career

Colleagues and I have a new paper out: Redefining ‘early career’ in academia: a collective narrative approach.* This is a paper I am proud of and, perhaps not coincidentally, it is one that has taken many years from the initial research conversations to this publication. In brief, we want to redefine early career to encompass … Continue reading Redefining early career

Cathartic writing

In a recent post I mentioned my daughter's epilepsy and my implanted neurostimulator for pain management. I write about these experiences, among others, in a newly published book chapter in Being an Early Career Feminist Academic. Look at this lovely cover: You can read the Times Higher Education review here: It is sad that this … Continue reading Cathartic writing

Reading dystopian fertility fiction for pleasure

Having discussed my (lack of) hobbies, I thought I could get away with a non-academic post and would like to share details of the prolific reading habit I mentioned. When I graduated from my PhD six years ago, I vowed that I would read more. I love reading and missed reading complex fiction during my … Continue reading Reading dystopian fertility fiction for pleasure