Bad feelings

This post returns to an idea from Rosalind Gill's review of Les Back's Academic Diary. She asks about bad affects: Academic Diary is ... overwhelmingly positive ... Where are the other, less palatable, affects and behaviours? Where is the envy, the rage, the nastiness, the bullying, the bad behaviour, the competitiveness, the mean-spiritedness, the colleagues who dump on … Continue reading Bad feelings

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Back and forth

I love ongoing scholarly conversations that take place in the public sphere. I recently read Les Back's (2016) delightful Academic Diary: Or why higher education still matters which chronicles the seasonal temporalities of thirty years of academic life (with thanks to Tai Peseta for the recommendation). No doubt I will have more posts inspired by … Continue reading Back and forth

“Career suicide”

(Image from BLASST cartoons) When I accepted my first academic position on completion of my PhD, I was pretty happy about it. My PhD was in Cultural Studies examining corporeal feminist philosophy and motherhood. (At the risk of understating it, this topic is not generally considered a canny choice for any career, but it was … Continue reading “Career suicide”

Undercare in the academy

Sometimes a new (to me) word comes along that seems to perfectly encapsulate a whole lot of previously disconnected ideas. This week that word was undercare. Not neglect, just not enough care. I read the word in an article in The Australian magazine: What doesn't kill you about the impacts of chaotic childhood experiences. It … Continue reading Undercare in the academy

Teaching and mortality

I've been thinking about my approach to teaching lately. Several things have prompted this: I was recently awarded Senior Fellowship of the UK's Higher Education Academy (which involved writing a reflective teaching philosophy), and I am co-editing a special issue of Australian Universities' Review on activism and the academy (with teaching as activist practice a … Continue reading Teaching and mortality

How (not) to do a PhD

My colleague, PhD candidate and friend Lilia Mantai has recently submitted her PhD (on time) and received a Faculty Highly Commended award for her achievements as an HDR student. Last year, we gave a keynote at the Western Sydney University entitled: PhD Student: Doing, Being and Moving On. Some of this post is drawn from … Continue reading How (not) to do a PhD