When things aren’t slow

This post was prompted by my agreeing to take on a new leadership role with an estimated workload of one day a week. It was also triggered by a feeling of trepidation when a colleague asked what I was up to at the moment. I made a list of the things I am doing in July … Continue reading When things aren’t slow

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“Career suicide”

(Image from BLASST cartoons) When I accepted my first academic position on completion of my PhD, I was pretty happy about it. My PhD was in Cultural Studies examining corporeal feminist philosophy and motherhood. (At the risk of understating it, this topic is not generally considered a canny choice for any career, but it was … Continue reading “Career suicide”

Doomed

This post was prompted by a sentence in Berg and Seeber's (2016) The Slow Professor manifesto: The language of crisis dominates the literature on the corporate university, urging us to act before it is too late. Yes, apocalyptic visions are alive and well in writing about universities and academics. Students (especially doctoral candidates), staff (especially … Continue reading Doomed

Planning and dreaming

I don't consider myself a great planner. I often enjoy unintended outcomes more than the predetermined. I love the happy discoveries of serendipity (even the word is a joy). Here's to creativity sparked by reading, unexpected calls for papers, conferences and conversations with colleagues! A ResearchWhisperer post by Tseen Khoo earlier this year made me … Continue reading Planning and dreaming

Research targets: the pirate code for academics

Today I had a short conversation with an early career academic that made me thankful that I decided to start this blog. I enjoyed talking with her - it was our first meeting, and she came across as smart, ambitious and engaging. She is also working at a punishing rate. She told me that six … Continue reading Research targets: the pirate code for academics

Redefining early career

Colleagues and I have a new paper out: Redefining ‘early career’ in academia: a collective narrative approach.* This is a paper I am proud of and, perhaps not coincidentally, it is one that has taken many years from the initial research conversations to this publication. In brief, we want to redefine early career to encompass … Continue reading Redefining early career

Cathartic writing

In a recent post I mentioned my daughter's epilepsy and my implanted neurostimulator for pain management. I write about these experiences, among others, in a newly published book chapter in Being an Early Career Feminist Academic. Look at this lovely cover: You can read the Times Higher Education review here: It is sad that this … Continue reading Cathartic writing