Enjoying the little things

Last year, listening to the radio on the way to work, ABC Classic FM played a piece of music that was performed only once during the composer's life. It might have been Rachmaninoff's first symphony, which was difficult to write, had a disastrous first performance and triggered an episode of severe depression. Of his symphony, … Continue reading Enjoying the little things

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Immortality (of a sort)

Last week I submitted a teaching module on the Politics of Higher Education (co-authored with Cathy Rytmeister) for peer review. All going well, it should be part of a MOOC (massive open online course, for those outside higher education) next year. This is a predominantly Australian module that explores how history informs the future and … Continue reading Immortality (of a sort)

Tea with resistance

This post brings together a host of ideas from previous posts: tea, resistance, complicity and activism. I recently read Richard Hil and Kristen Lyon's article A Post-Neoliberal Academy? in which the authors explore how academic compliance has been a key ingredient in the "neoliberal takeover" of universities. The authors list strategies of resistance that provide a … Continue reading Tea with resistance

Complicity

Like many of you, no doubt, I have been watching The Handmaid's Tale. The first episode includes a scene of (what Atwood called) particicution (combining the words “participation” and “execution”) where the handmaids kill an alleged rapist with their bare hands. I struggled to fall asleep afterwards for thinking about brutality and complicity. So, ever … Continue reading Complicity

Back and forth

I love ongoing scholarly conversations that take place in the public sphere. I recently read Les Back's (2016) delightful Academic Diary: Or why higher education still matters which chronicles the seasonal temporalities of thirty years of academic life (with thanks to Tai Peseta for the recommendation). No doubt I will have more posts inspired by … Continue reading Back and forth

Doomed

This post was prompted by a sentence in Berg and Seeber's (2016) The Slow Professor manifesto: The language of crisis dominates the literature on the corporate university, urging us to act before it is too late. Yes, apocalyptic visions are alive and well in writing about universities and academics. Students (especially doctoral candidates), staff (especially … Continue reading Doomed