Back and forth

I love ongoing scholarly conversations that take place in the public sphere. I recently read Les Back's (2016) delightful Academic Diary: Or why higher education still matters which chronicles the seasonal temporalities of thirty years of academic life (with thanks to Tai Peseta for the recommendation). No doubt I will have more posts inspired by … Continue reading Back and forth

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What I’m reading

At an early career community of practice meeting this week, we talked about academic writing. I shared some of my favourite blogs and websites: Cecile Badenhorst Doctoral Writing SIG Dynamics of Knowledge Creation Explorations of Style Helen Kara Helen Sword Mind Your Writing Patter Thinkwell We discussed our challenges and, as has happened in past … Continue reading What I’m reading

Enabling dissent

Last week I attended the annual Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (HERDSA) conference. I really appreciated the sustained and vibrant  participation by students across the conference. Over three days I attended sessions on peer review, teaching induction, research-informed teaching and quality curriculum; collected a wealth of resources and ideas; planned research with … Continue reading Enabling dissent

“Career suicide”

(Image from BLASST cartoons) When I accepted my first academic position on completion of my PhD, I was pretty happy about it. My PhD was in Cultural Studies examining corporeal feminist philosophy and motherhood. (At the risk of understating it, this topic is not generally considered a canny choice for any career, but it was … Continue reading “Career suicide”

Undercare in the academy

Sometimes a new (to me) word comes along that seems to perfectly encapsulate a whole lot of previously disconnected ideas. This week that word was undercare. Not neglect, just not enough care. I read the word in an article in The Australian magazine: What doesn't kill you about the impacts of chaotic childhood experiences. It … Continue reading Undercare in the academy

Doomed

This post was prompted by a sentence in Berg and Seeber's (2016) The Slow Professor manifesto: The language of crisis dominates the literature on the corporate university, urging us to act before it is too late. Yes, apocalyptic visions are alive and well in writing about universities and academics. Students (especially doctoral candidates), staff (especially … Continue reading Doomed